Tips for Families During the Holidays – Spotting Signs of a Problem, Getting Help, Staying Sober

By Cara McLeod, MA, LPC, EMDR-Trained Clinician, Enterhealth Outpatient Center of Excellence

Spotting Signs of a Problem Starts with Self-Evaluation

The holidays are usually a time of celebration, family and love. It’s also a time when many people get to see their extended family, kids are home from college and they get together with family members not usually seen on a regular basis. Challenges due to work deadlines, family dysfunction and financial obligations (and many other things) can make stress levels go through the roof, and this extra holiday stress can drive people to self-medicate with alcohol.

At Enterhealth – a premier drug and alcohol addiction treatment company based in Dallas – we understand that this period can also be one of the most trying times of the year. As such, this can be a good time of year to first do a self-evaluation – that is, take a step back and look at your own drinking habits.

Enterhealth recommends that men drink no more than four drinks per day, with a maximum of 15 per week. For women, the recommendation is no more than three drinks per day or a maximum of 8 drinks per week. One standard drink is equal to:

·         12 oz. standard beer

·         5 oz. standard wine 

·         8-9 oz. malt liquor or craft beer

·         1.5 oz. of hard liquor (rum, vodka, whiskey, etc.)

The holidays are also a good time of year to observe and evaluate family members, especially if you have concerns that a family member may have a problem with substance abuse. Some signs to watch for include:

·         General isolation

·         Dishonesty

·         Odd changes in behavior

·         Secretive/hiding behavior

·         Changes in peer groups

·         Difficulty staying awake or sleeping

·         Drinking more than intended

·         Loss of functioning due to intoxication (e.g., unable to go to work, attend school, parent children, etc.)

·         Losing control of substance use (e.g., says will only have two drinks but has more)

·         Ignoring help/advice

While none of these signs on their own are definite signals that someone may have a problem, it’s when they start to stack up that you should be concerned. If you are worried that a family member has a problem with drugs or alcohol, the best thing to do is first initiate a conversation, find out what the situation is and see if you can help them seek professional intervention.

How to be Sensitive to Family Members in Recovery

If you or someone you care about is a recovering alcoholic, your family needs to understand that no alcohol should be around at any family gatherings or celebrations. We recommend that patients in recovery wait at least a year before being around alcohol use. You want the family celebrations and bonding to be in alcohol-free environments, and people in recovery already get enough temptation from commercials, social media, etc. If family members cannot abstain from alcohol to support a family member in recovery, that person should consider whether or not he or she has their own problem with drinking.

If you or someone in your family is an alcoholic, here are five tips that can help during the holiday season:

Tip #1 – Spend Time with Sober People

Alcohol recovery can be tough, especially during the holidays. In addition to removing temptation, it’s important to be around positive and sober people for support.

Tip #2 – The “I’ll Take a Soda” Approach

While it’s hard to avoid alcohol when you’re at a holiday party, you can combat it by substituting a nice cold soda or some other non-alcoholic beverage in its place. However, do not use nonalcoholic beer or wine, as they contain traces of alcohol and can set off certain areas of the brain which can reactivate cravings for alcohol.

Tip #3 – Manage Your Stress

You can help manage your drinking problem by managing your stress. Find other ways to deal with stress, such as talking with a friend or family member, exercise, or have a set time in the day to relax.

Tip #4 – Indulge Yourself

It’s hard for many to stop drinking, especially during the holiday season. You can benefit from not yielding to the temptation of drinking by rewarding yourself for every time that you don’t drink. Reward yourself with a small gift, treat or anything else that brings you happiness.

Tip #5 – Have a “Plan B”

When battling an addiction, it’s important to have a plan just in case you find yourself in an environment where there is alcohol present and you cannot handle the temptation. Having a plan and knowing how you’re going to handle the situation will help you significantly. Tell a family member and/or close friend about your recovery process, and call them in case of an emergency to help you in those situations.

More often than not, it takes more than tips and family support to remain sober during the holidays. Enterhealth, a Dallas-based alcohol and drug addiction recovery center, offers a customized medically-based model of addiction treatment that reverses the effects of substance abuse on the brain.

Enterhealth typically sees a rise in the number of people seeking assistance during the holidays, and there are a few good reasons why getting treatment around the holidays can be beneficial. For most people, the holiday season is a time when work slows down. It’s also the time of year when school breaks and a time when a lot of people are using their vacation days anyway. Plus, getting clean of drugs or alcohol is a great way to start the new year afresh.

To learn more about how Enterhealth Ranch and Enterhealth Outpatient Center of Excellence help with addiction, as well as more helpful tips for staying sober this holiday season, please call 1.800.388.4601 for more information, or visit our website at enterhealth.com.